What's trending on NP Privacy Partner



July 08, 2016

NP Privacy Partner

Author(s): Gretchen E. Sherwood, Jenny L. Holmes, Michal E. Ovadia, John G. Roman, Jr., CISSP, Rebecca Simone, James W. Weller

The EU approves Privacy Shield Data Transfer Pact, “Brexit” could mean further changes in data privacy abroad, criminal consequences are handed down for a HIPAA violation, amendments aimed at providing law enforcement with access to digital communications stall in Congress, and some tips on how to protect your company from malvertising.

International

EU member states approve the Privacy Shield Data Transfer Pact

The approval clears the way for formal implementation.—Jenny R. Lewis & Kate A.F. Martinez

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Brexit: what it could mean for the EU’s data privacy regime

“Brexit” could disrupt the EU’s scheme for uniform data privacy laws.—Jenny R. Lewis

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Mobile Technology & Websites

Do wearables track personal information without protecting privacy?

Wearables have grown wildly popular over the last several years as a means to encourage healthy habits and increase consumer’s knowledge of their own health information, but is data collected by wearables free for the taking?—Gretchen E. Harper

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Consumer Privacy

Lawsuit for the misuse of driver’s license information settled

The lawsuit reminds both companies and government entities of what can happen when their actions or policies do not adequately prevent employees from illegally using or accessing private information.—Rebecca Simone

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Proposed changes to ECPA stalled

Legislators continue trying to pass amendments that would ease law enforcement access.—Jenny R. Lewis

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Health Care & HIPAA

Criminal consequences for HIPAA violation

It is vital that health care organizations take the necessary steps to prevent their employees from wrongfully accessing protected health information.—James W. Weller & Michal E. Ovadia

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Cybersecurity

How do I protect my company from malvertising?

Malvertising is one of the most common ways of infecting computers with malware.—John G. Roman, Jr., CISSP

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The foregoing has been prepared for the general information of clients and friends of the firm. It is not meant to provide legal advice with respect to any specific matter and should not be acted upon without professional counsel. If you have any questions or require any further information regarding these or other related matters, please contact your regular Nixon Peabody LLP representative. This material may be considered advertising under certain rules of professional conduct.

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