What’s trending on NP Privacy Partner



February 10, 2017

NP Privacy Partner

Author(s): Kristen Marotta, Steven M. Richard, John G. Roman, Jr., CISSP

Video game developers obtain dismissal on putative class action, court denies employer’s efforts to obtain GPS data from employee-owned devices, the House of Representatives passes e-mail privacy act, an NFL player’s lawsuit is settled, and the top five threats you should look for in 2017. Here’s what’s trending in data privacy and cybersecurity.

Privacy Litigation & Class Action

Court rejects claims under Illinois Biometric Act relating to video game facial scans

Video game developers obtain the dismissal of putative class action raising claims about biometric data.—Steven M. Richard

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Employee/Workplace Privacy

Court denies employer’s efforts to obtain GPS data from employee-owned devices

Employment cases often pose questions about the scope to which data on employee-owned devices must be produced in discovery.—Steven M. Richard

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Cybersecurity

House of Representatives passes E-mail Privacy Act

The House of Representative passes legislation to enhance the privacy of emails on servers, as the issue heads to the Senate.—Steven M. Richard

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Top five threats to information security in 2017

What consumers and companies should be on the look-out for in 2017.—John G. Roman, Jr., CISSP

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Enforcement Litigation

NFL player’s lawsuit on the posting of medical records has been settled

The settlement terms have not been disclosed.—Kristen Marotta

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